Episode 16b: Posture and Pain: Low back pain fact 6 with patient voice Joe, and Nic Saraceni

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Low back pain is still the world’s most disabling health condition and costs more than cancer and diabetes combined. A scientific journal article covering 10 facts about low back pain was recently published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine (http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2019-101611). The origins and motivations for that paper, as well as patient stories, were covered in episodes 4 and 5 of the podcast. In this episode, Professor Peter O’Sullivan and Kevin Wernli welcome back patient voice Joe from episode 14 and researcher/physiotherapist Nic Saraceni. Together, they discuss low back pain fact number 6: Posture does not cause back pain. From sitting posture to lifting posture, sleeping posture and everything in between – it’s all discussed in this episode.

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Episode Show Notes:

O’Sullivan PBCaneiro JO’Sullivan K, et al
Back to basics: 10 facts every person should know about back pain
low back pain infographic

 

The posture and pain infographic discussed in the podcast:
Posture infographic

From this paper: 

Slater D, Korakakis V, O’Sullivan P, Nolan D, O’Sullivan K. “Sit Up Straight”: Time to Re-evaluate. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2019 Aug;49(8):562-564. doi: 10.2519/jospt.2019.0610. PMID: 31366294.

Other Supporting references:

Nic Saraceni’s Review:

Nic SaraceniPeter KentLeo NgAmity CampbellLeon Straker, and Peter O’Sullivan

Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy 2020 50:3121-130

Lifting position low back pain

 

Nolan D, O’Sullivan K, Newton C, Singh G, Smith BE. Are there differences in lifting technique between those with and without low back pain? A systematic review. Scand J Pain. 2020 Apr 28;20(2):215-227. doi: 10.1515/sjpain-2019-0089. PMID: 31730537.

Heneweer, H., Staes, F., Aufdemkampe, G., van Rijn, M., & Vanhees, L. (2011). Physical activity and low back pain: a systematic review of recent literature. Eur Spine J, 20(6), 826-845. doi:10.1007/s00586-010-1680-7

Coenen, P., Kingma, I., Boot, C., Twisk, J., Bongers, P., & Dieën, J. (2013). Cumulative Low Back Load at Work as a Risk Factor of Low Back Pain: A Prospective Cohort Study. J Occup Rehabil, 23(1), 11-18. doi:10.1007/s10926-012-9375-z

Coenen, P., Kingma, I., Boot, C. R., Bongers, P. M., & van Dieen, J. H. (2014). Cumulative mechanical low-back load at work is a determinant of low-back pain. Occupational & Environmental Medicine, 71(5), 332-337. doi:https://dx.doi.org/10.1136/oemed-2013-101862

Martimo, K. P., Verbeek, J., Karppinen, J., Furlan, A. D., Takala, E. P., Kuijer, P. P., . . . Viikari-Juntura, E. (2008). Effect of training and lifting equipment for preventing back pain in lifting and handling: systematic review. BMJ, 336(7641), 429-431. doi:10.1136/bmj.39463.418380.BE

Verbeek, J., Martimo, K. P., Karppinen, J., Kuijer, P. P., Takala, E. P., & Viikari-Juntura, E. (2012). Manual material handling advice and assistive devices for preventing and treating back pain in workers: a Cochrane Systematic Review. Occup Environ Med, 69(1), 79-80. doi:10.1136/oemed-2011-100214

Verbeek, J. H., Martimo, K. P., Kuijer, P. P., Karppinen, J., Viikari-Juntura, E., & Takala, E. P. (2012). Proper manual handling techniques to prevent low back pain, a Cochrane systematic review. Work, 41 Suppl 1, 2299-2301. doi:10.3233/wor-2012-0455-2299

Kuijer, P. P., Verbeek, J. H., Visser, B., Elders, L. A., Van Roden, N., Van den Wittenboer, M. E., . . . Hulshof, C. T. (2014). An Evidence-Based Multidisciplinary Practice Guideline to Reduce the Workload due to Lifting for Preventing Work-Related Low Back Pain. Ann Occup Environ Med, 26, 16. doi:10.1186/2052-4374-26-16

Hogan, D. A., Greiner, B. A., & O’Sullivan, L. (2014). The effect of manual handling training on achieving training transfer, employee’s behaviour change and subsequent reduction of work-related musculoskeletal disorders: a systematic review. Ergonomics, 57(1), 93-107. doi:10.1080/00140139.2013.862307

Schaafsma, F. G., et al. (2015). “Back pain: Prevention and management in the workplace.” Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol 29(3): 483-494.

Mitchell, T., O’Sullivan, P. B., Burnett, A., Straker, L., Smith, A., Thornton, J., & Rudd, C. J. (2010). Identification of modifiable personal factors that predict new-onset low back pain: a prospective study of female nursing students. Clin J Pain, 26(4), 275-283. doi:10.1097/AJP.0b013e3181cd16e1

Machado, G. C., et al. (2016). “Transient physical and psychosocial activities increase the risk of nonpersistent and persistent low back pain: a case-crossover study with 12 months follow-up.” Spine Journal 16(12): 1445-1452.

Inability to perform because of pain/injury in elite adult Irish dance: A prospective investigation of contributing factors.

Cahalan R, O’Sullivan P, Purtill H, Bargary N, Ni Bhriain O, O’Sullivan K.Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2016 Jun;26(6):694-702. doi: 10.1111/sms.12492. Epub 2015 Jun 3.PMID: 26040202
PASSIVE TISSUES HELP THE BACK MUSCLES TO GENERATE EXTENSOR MOMENTS DURING LIFTING P. DOLAN, A. F. MANNION and M. A. ADAMS J. Biomechanics, Vol. 27, No. 8, pp. 1077-1085, 1994
Coenen, P., et al. (2017). “Abdominal bracing during lifting alters trunk muscle activity and body kinematics.” Appl Ergon 63: 91-98.
Wernli, KO’Sullivan, PSmith, ACampbell, AKent, PMovement, posture and low back pain. How do they relate? A replicated single‐case design in 12 people with persistent, disabling low back painEur J Pain2020241831– 1849https://doi.org/10.1002/ejp.1631

Transcript

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